Archives for posts with tag: Robert Good

2010 at a distance

Delighted to be included in Visions In The Nunnery at Bow Arts and so good to be at the opening with live performances. Robert Luzar with Timo Kube Tracing Someone Else’s Skin and Libby Heaney presenting Top of the Bots karaoke where audience members embody pop idols via AI technology. 2010 Visions Robert LuzarBodies touching and people singing seemed illicit and extra joyful. 2010 Top of The BotsVisions in the Nunnery is Bow Arts’ biennial showcase of international moving image and performance art.

2010 VisionsLeaflet_Digital-2

Lead artist for Programme 2 is Nye Thompson. Creating new data-generating artist software systems she explores the hidden impact of new technologies. For Visions she premieres /artefact, an immersive work building a colossal border wall on Mars through satellite and google earth imagery accompanied by a throaty space-filled soundtrack.

2010 Visions Nye Thompson

For the first time, all Visions 2020 works will also be available online for international audiences and those shielding. The themes of programme 2 include digital mediation, digital infrastructure, the remote gaze, CCTV, borders and separation, other worlds and alternate geographies.

2010 at a distance 2

In At a Distance solitary figures using semaphore flags sign ‘We Are One’ out across the ocean. Filmed on 29th March 2019, the first date the UK was supposed to leave the EU.

As in quantum entanglement theory where two paired electrons mirror each other at a distance it is hoped the message will be echoed back. This mysterious twinning of electrons where particles link in a way that they instantly affect each other, even over vast distances is what Einstein famously called ‘spooky action at a distance’.  The 4m video includes mirrored footage of the iconic Lizard Point Lighthouse and covers the time it takes for the lamp to power up. The video is back projected onto a Fresnel lens, similar to that found in lighthouses to increase luminosity of the lamps beam.

Exhibition and launch images below by Rob Harris courtesy of The Nunnery Gallery.

Updated my website Finding Paradise project pages with Paradise(suspended).

2009 featured image

Making (slow) progress on new moving image work Seeker, Seer, Scientist.

We each have a personal distance to the horizon based on our specific height of eye from the ground and the local elevation from sea level at which we stand. It is a place we can never reach as it always recedes as we approach.

Walking East at dawn.

2010 East 1

In my enthusiasm I may’ve set off a little too early and some footage has turned out to be rather dark, though passing the Sewage Treatment Works at this hour was an uncanny futuristic experience. It was the hummmm.

2010 East 2

Grappling with abstract space as I research for the audio track. Revisiting a lecture I attended at UCL on the 7th dimension by Jason D. Lotay

As you go up in dimensions there are more symmetries that you cannot see. There are special symmetries that only happen in the 7th dimension, this holonomy set of transformations is called G2.

There are 7 new numbers known as Octonians. The symmetry of the Octonians is precisely G2.

2010 symmetry

M theory unites the various different string theories into one master theory but in order to do this there must be 11 dimensions. These 11 dimensions are the 4 we know (3 dimensions + time) + 7 new dimensions (related to G2) (which I think allows for the multiverse to exist)

The 7th dimension is closely related to soap films and soap bubbles in that these try to minimise their surface area. Seventh dimensional things with holonomy G2 also try to minimise a kind of energy or area.

1810 freezing bubble

I am continuing to film soap film as light is spectacularly reflected from the surface. The colours depend on the thickness of the water sandwiched between the soap and as the membrane becomes so thin just before breaking the colours fade away.

2010 membrane filming

Trying a new soap bubble recipe with lots more glycerin and a different brand of washing-up liquid. I also have a larger frame for the soap film so I don’t know which factor has effected the results most but I’m getting falling rainbow stripes morphing to grey and black swirls.

2010 membrane 22010 membrane 1

Finally ventured back into the Print Studio to clean my screens ready for potential new work. It’s the first time I had been back for months. I’m working on images of glacial water which has been trapped for 80,000 years.

Everything we can see, everything we know exists, makes up just five percent of the matter and energy in the universe.

I watched the live stream Dark Matter Day event live from Sanford Underground Research Facility and Boulby Underground Laboratory and was struck by the use of the word shielding, it’s all about shielding which of course is something we hear a lot about now amid the pandemic. In the case of dark matter detection experiments it is about shielding from cosmic rays. On the surface of the earth 2/3 Muons pass through your hand every second, in the underground labs this is reduced by a factor of 10,000,000 to about once a month.

2010 particle trail

I also learnt that gravity travels at the speed of light.

Some wonderful online discussions are being had by The Diagram Research Group (DRG), a collaboration between artists David Burrows, John Cussans, Dean Kenning and Mary Yacoob. Each collaborator conducts an illustrated discussion that explores their interest in diagrams in relation to Flat Time and Latham’s ideas concerning the unification of scientific and artistic bodies of knowledge and the primacy of time and event (rather than space and matter).

As part of the National Parks Virtual Dark Skies Week 2020 there were a series of online events available such as a talk on The Search For Dark Energy from Dr Luke Tyas. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion of the universe. It will obtain optical spectra for tens of millions of galaxies and quasars, constructing a 3D map spanning the nearby universe to 11 billion light years. 

2010 stargazing

Looking at new ways to experience dimensions, Laure Provoust explores her approach to installations as living works, with sculptural elements and films that function in 3-D, invoking the viewer’s senses of taste and touch. In an online talk hosted by Yorkshire Sculpture Park she introduces us to her installation at Lisson Gallery where we are invited to learn a new language, new ways of connecting and associating.

2010 Laure Prouvost

It reminds me of the Carsten Höller perception-altering device I experienced back in 2015 that fed each eye with a different woodland perspective. I found it very unsettling. Like my brain was splitting. 

2010 Carsten Holler

This year I had to experience the London Film Festival at home with streamed content but was able to visit the BFI Blue room for the Expanded programme The Expanse, a gallery of immersive 360 videos and interactive virtual reality experiences. This was all free with lots of Covid safe help on hand to enjoy the VR.

Icarus – ‘don’t think of my fall, think of me soaring to the sun.’

2010 Icarus BFI

THE END Heather Phillipson’s sculpture of excess on the Fourth Plinth transmits a live feed of Trafalgar Square picked up by the drone’s camera and visible on a dedicated website www.theend.today giving a sculpture’s eye perspective.

2010 heather phillipson The End

Fascinating work by Trevor Paglen at Pace Gallery uncovers the hidden agendas and bias present in systems which now govern many aspects of our lives.

The works in this exhibition seek to provide a small glimpse into the workings of platforms that track faces, nature and human behaviour, and into the underlying data that structures how machines ‘perceive’ humans and landscapes.

You can visit virtually through a live web portal connected to cameras placed in the gallery, observe gallery visitors experiencing the work in real time and can even be “present” in the space by streaming your own webcam onto monitors displayed within the exhibition. Or you can visit in person as I did where I was assessed and evaluated by ‘ImageNet Roulette’ an interactive artwork that classifies people’s digitally-captured portraits according to one of the most widely-used datasets used for training and evaluating computer vision systems.

My classification oscillated between ‘dosser’ and ‘char’.

‘Bloom’, a series of large-scale photographs that depict flower formations conceptualized by various computer vision algorithms created to analyse the constituent parts of real-life photographs. The colours and shapes in the images represent similar areas that the AI has detected in learning from other images of flowers. They do not represent real-to-life colours so much as what the AI thinks the different parts of the images are.

‘The Standard Head’ is a large-scale reconstruction of the 1960’s mathematical model of a “standard head” by the pioneering researcher funded by the CIA, Woody Bledsoe. Conceived from the average measurements of the faces Bledsoe experimented with, Paglen reconstructed the “standard head” from rare information left behind in Bledsoe’s archives at the University of Texas. Artificial intelligence algorithms are designed and trained to look for faces, unique key points, lines, circles, and areas of interest as they attempt to deconstruct the underlying reality into a more simplified series of sections or shapes.

2010 Trevor Paglen 7

‘The Model (Personality)’, a plated bronze phrenology skull derived from the current categories that are used in predictive policing and sentencing algorithms that intend to gauge someone’s level of criminality by measuring their psychological attributes and behaviours.

2010 Trevor Paglen 1

‘Distracted Drivers’ and ‘Classifications of Gait’ showcase grids composed of thousands of smaller images used to evaluate people’s behaviours for commercial purposes.

The dataset for ‘Distracted Drivers’, for example, is a collection of images used to recognise if someone is distracted while driving by an AI system. This dataset was created by State Farm insurance to adjust their insurance premiums in real-time, based on that information.

The group exhibition Washing Line curated by Neil Zakiewicz and Patrick Morrissey at Thames-side Gallery took work away from the gallery walls and strung it across space. This made for a dynamic viewing experience negotiating a route to new perspectives. Two dimensional work hanging out in the world of three dimensions.

Robert Good’s stream(ers) of questions from Google News Feed rams home not only the overwhelming assault of media but the constant interrogation we are subject to. Another form of surveillance.

2010 Robert Good

Elizabeth Price raising the ghosts of a lost era in Slow Dans an Artangel presentation at The Assembly Rooms on Borough Road. This was a haunting and fascinating evocation of lost landscapes and what is quite recent but rapidly disappearing social history. Mineshafts, ink-wells, the human throat connect a geological past with a technological present.

2010 Elizabeth Price 12010 Elizabeth Price 22010 Elizabeth Price 3

The latest ACA Project Continuum  is launched and I am looking forward to contributing to the programme with some new work exploring the activity of cosmic rays at the edge of the earths atmosphere. I have had two productive meetings with the Imperial College Space Society and the project to launch a high altitude balloon with a cloud chamber in the payload is underway. The first tasks are to make contact with the Civil Aviation Authority ahead of requesting flight permissions and researching how to safely transport helium to the prospective launch site.

1902 DIY mini cloud chamber

The team have been issued with their own mini cloud chamber kit to test and use as a basis for designing the prototype for launch which must be able to function in low air pressure and turbulence.

There was a fantastic turnout to Culture Lab. Newcastle University for the first Continuum event in an inspiring season of art, science and speculative fiction taking place at Allenheads, Hexham and Newcastle. So happy to be involved in this new project.

1902 Continuum Launch

We heard from Minna Långström about her latest film The Other Side of Mars and her installation Photons from Mars which explore how we see Mars through the mediated eyes of technology.

1902 Continuum launch Minna Langstrom

Robert Good analysed what happens at the intersection of art and science, concluding that insight comes from multiple perspectives working together.

1902 Continuum Launch Robert Good

Pippa Goldschmidt read from her texts The Need for Better Regulation of Outer Space and Falling Sky highlighting the emotional and lived experience of the scientists who square up to the big questions in astronomy. She has fascinating first hand knowledge of the political sensitivities surrounding studying the stars when visiting observatories such as in the Chilean Atacama Desert when the nation is undergoing a military coup.

1902 The Falling Sky - Pippa Goldschmidt

Chris Welch professor of space engineering from The International Space University gave a lively account of Space Travel. Fact and Fiction; current technology, theoretical technology and science fiction technology. Sometimes it’s hard to tell one from the other.

1902 Continuum Launch Chris Welch

He also kindly allowed us to handle a mini rocket smuggled in from Strasbourg

1902 Continuum Launch mini rocket

The artist Nahum relayed a beautiful story of the moon landings from the moon’s perspective written by an 11 year old refugee girl and punctuated by real magic. This originated from his work giving refugee children a sense of belonging by imagining looking back at earth from space to see that we are all human on one tiny planet. In other work aiming to democratise space travel he hypnotised his audience in order to prompt false memories of visiting the moon into their minds.

1902 Continuum Launch Nahum assited by Minna Langstrom

John Bowers and Tim Shaw ended the evening with mesmeric visualisation and acoustics extrapolated from electromagnetic waves generated by meteors, minerals and mystical phenomenon.

1902 Continuum Launch John Bowers

It was a quick visit to Allenheads this time but Annie Carpenter, Nicola Ellis, Robert Good and myself can look forward to an upcoming week of research and stories around the fire as a prelude to making new work for the project.

1806 fire

Delighted that my work Pentacoronae has been selected for the exhibition Insatiable Mind which is part of the Salisbury International Arts Festival 2019. The festival will highlight the anniversaries of the Fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the Moon Landing of 1969. The exhibition seeks to convey the notion of leaving behind the comforts of the familiar in order to discover the unknown.

Pentacoronae encourages the viewer to seek darkness, stargaze, wonder and map their own stories across the sky.

1902 Pentacoronae photo John Hooper

Maybe I should take my cloud chamber with me to Salisbury just to make sure that clean up of radioactive material was as successful as they claim.

1711 cosmic trail

More exciting news is that Carol Wyss, Anne Krinsky and myself have been awarded a two week takeover of Hackney’s oldest building, St. Augustine’s Tower.

1902 St Augustines Tower 2

The tower is the last remains of the original church built in the late 13th century.

1902 St Augustines Tower 1

Our proposal is for an exhibition of site-specific new works made in response to St. Augustine’s Tower and the historic role of spires as a symbolic connection between earth, mortals and the heavens.

1902 St Augustines Tower

There are four floors connected by a narrow stone spiral staircase.

1902 St Augustines Tower roof

It has an amazing clock dating from about 1580; the pendulum case is on the first floor, the clock on the second and the bell on the third floor.

1902 St Augustines Tower 3

Drawing on our individual interests in geology (Anne Krinsky), anatomy (Carol Wyss) and cosmology (Susan Eyre) we will curate the exhibition with the intent of sparking a dialogue between works installed to convey a cohesive exploration of materiality, the passage of time and wider philosophical issues evoked by these relationships.

1902 St Augustines Tower graveyard

 

The New Materialisms Reading group I attend have been reading The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben. It is extraordinary to discover how trees communicate and consider the slow time at which they operate and the age and extent of the largest known living organism, the fungi web. I also have a whole new raft of guilt to contend with.

1902 branch partile decay.jpg

I am also out collecting images of bare branches that resonate with the idea of particle decay.

1901 Cosmic ray decay

1902 disperse prep

In the studio painting ‘entanglement’ in disperse inks to heat press for the semaphore flags ready for the Lizard Point Residency. Semaphore = information at a distance, entanglement = spooky action at a distance (according to Einstein)

 

 

 

 

Out of the Studio….

Called at SPACE to see Anna Chrystal Stephens’ show Anorak. A derogatory term for an obsessive but maybe it’s a necessary trait if you are to survive in alternative social possibilities. Either that or develop superpowers.

1902 Anna Chrystal Stephens

I joined Robert Good at the opening of Word Bank of Lost Dialects at The Word National Centre for the Written Word, South Tyneside. Word Bank of Lost Dialects created by Jane Glennie and Robert Good is a fascinating documentation of the thousands of North East dialect words donated by visitors to The Word’s original Lost Dialects exhibition.

Also opening at The Word was Cracked! Secret Codes and Communication, with a very useful semaphore flag chart – just what I needed for the work I am planning for the upcoming Lizard Point Residency. In 2019 the Lizard is celebrating the 400 year anniversary of Sir John Killigrew’s building of the first lighthouse on Lizard Point in 1619. The subsequent lighthouse also has important links to the search for reliable Longitude measurement, with an assistant to the astronomer royal visiting the lighthouse at the time of the first Transit of Venus to record an accurate location for the Lizard Rocks. The world famous Goonhilly also celebrates the 50 year anniversary of their transmission of the first lunar landings. We will also be visiting wireless and semaphore stations along the Lizard coastal path, considering the Scilly Isles 30 miles out to sea and the important prehistoric menhirs offering ‘beacons’ for travel & procession across the land.

1902 Cracking Codes (1).jpg

Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms at The British Library was full of ancient treasures from the Library’s own collection, including the Lindisfarne Gospels, Beowulf and Bede’s Ecclesiastical History, the Domesday Book and Codex Amiatinus, a giant Northumbrian Bible taken to Italy in 716, returning to England for the first time in 1300 years. A surprising number of books in flourishing scripts, illuminated, illustrated and bound in sculpted covers. However I found it very frustrating to be presented with so many undecipherable pages and envied those muttering in Latin or Old English who could gain some insight. More translations please. Possibly you had to buy the catalogue to learn more.

1902 Marvels-of-the-East-from-a-collection-of-geographical-astronomical-and-other-texts_credit-British-Library-.jpg

Inspired by the legend of How Raven Stole the Sun and brought light to the world Joana Escoval’s  The Sun Lovers at Tenderpixel dazzled with an overload of fluorescent tubes.

1902 Joana Escoval 2

Especially blinding when visiting at the twilight hour. The story and further daydreams  were reduced to minimalist gestures in gold wire, feathers and blasted rock.

To celebrate Chinese New Year of the pig the mass underground car park takeover Four legs good, two legs bad (a quote from George Orwell’s prescient 1945 book Animal Farm)was heavily porcine in theme with a weirdly anarchic yet delineated curation. Pick of the show was Carol Wyss and Anne Leigniel.

Some interesting work in Critical Matter at the reduced RCA Dyson Gallery from Rosanna Dean, Victoria Mihatovic, Susie Olczak and Samuel Padfield. Looking at the very current theme of entanglement of materials in the web of life in reference to the philosophy of  Henri Bergson who wrote Matter and Memory in 1896 which argued against memory as a purely physical embodiment.

Flux Social presenters this month were Adam John Williams // a.k.a Chemical Adam, Adeline Rozario from Tinderdust, and Sofi Lee-Henson. Another interesting evening and good to talk to Adam about his use of the cloud chamber to translate the randomness of radioactive decay into music.

I joined Walking as Material led by Lily German who took us through the city down to the shores of the Thames and up onto the walkways and bridges, stopping to look at the fabric of London and consider its past and the changing materials that make up its surfaces. Also the amount of sewage that must be dealt with.

1902 mattering walk bridge pillars1902 mattering walk steps down1902 mattering walk chains1902 mattering walk wall1902 mattering walk london stone

We ended the walk at Matter(ing), an exhibition investigating ides of materiality and the outcome of enabling materials to drive the creation of work at Platform Southwark from artists Abigail Brothers, Lily German and Sebastian Sochan.

Enjoyed the connections made by Zach Blas in his performance lecture Metric Mysticism at Edel Assanti. Tracing the use of the crystal ball from John Dee via Derek Jarman, David Bowie’s Labyrinth, Lord of the Rings, Saudi Arabia’s Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology to Palantir Technologies, a private American software company that specializes in big data analytics. Prophecies of a society controlled by the media and the police appear fulfilled.

1902 Zach Blas metric mystics

Treated to a personal private view of Draft at The Hospital Club by Mary Yacoob. Strong work held it’s own amongst the plush velvet sofas and hand embellished wallpaper.

1902 Mary Yacoob